IV97203: Hierarchical query for buildings with assets ends session


Users navigating to a hierarchical query of building and asset records have experienced user kickout (or timeout) behavior when entering or clearing filters.

We needed to prevent the load of a large hierarchical query with runtime user filters in a portal section that kicks the user out. Moving forward, we resolved an issue that could cause a user’s session to be terminated if the user interacts with an hierarchal query before the query has finished loading.

[Admin: This post is related to the 06.19.17 post about a user session terminated due to a missing security token. To see other related posts, use the Filter tag.]

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FM:Systems: Evolving Revit models for each phase of a building’s life


One of the challenges that building owners who implement lifecycle BIM face is the difference between the BIM models created for design and construction and the BIM models needed for operation. Although with proper procedures, building data can and should flow from one phase to the next, it is useful to identify at least four types of BIM models…

  • BIM Design Models: These are created by architects and engineers with the objective of first defining the conceptual design and ultimately producing construction documents…
  • BIM Construction Models: Contractors and subcontractors will use these models to aid in staging and detect potential conflicts using clash detection before encountering the issues in the field.
  • BIM As-Built Model: This is created by the general contractor, subcontractors and suppliers. Traditionally, this information has been provided as a set of paper working drawings…
  • BIM FM Model: This model is derived primarily from input from the BIM As-Built Model. When creating the BIM FM Model, the following modifications are made…

[Admin: To see other related posts, use the BIM tag.]

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Planon: Why do most real estate managers still need to know BIM?


Many real estate managers are rather surprised when their contractor shows up with loads of information at the hand-over of a new construction project. “It is all the information you need for the operational phase” he will say. Adding, “As we are really innovative, you will find everything in a digital model, called BIM.” After a discussion, in which the real estate manager explains that he only needs a small portion, a common response of the contractor is: “Real Estate & Facility Management is still old-fashioned, they don’t know what they need!” Is this a fair response?

The information challenge

Typically, users of an Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) have dealt with this challenge for many years. They have probably invested in maintaining CAD drawings to be able to import the gross and net m² of their spaces and updated their building assets at a relative high level. They have had to make maintenance budgets based on estimations of the amount of glass m² of their facades. When preparing for a renovation, they hire an architect to do exact measurements, which has always been the base for comparing offers of contractors to do their work.

Getting the most out of BIM

As contractors and architects are currently re-developing their business plans based on the use of Building Information Modelling (BIM), real estate managers are still investigating what this could mean for them. What possible benefits exist for maintaining a space with 3D dimensions? Or, which self-service/job-handling processes can really be improved by walking through a 3D model? Real estate managers that receive a BIM model will now have a hundred times more assets available than before. However, who will benefit from this type of information?

[Admin: To see other related posts, use the Planon tag.]

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FM trends in high-performance buildings and workplaces (HPB+W)


The annual High-Performance Buildings + Workplaces (HPB+W) conference takes place at the Arlington (Texas) Convention Center, May 17-18. Registration is free!

Greg Zimmerman brings more than 13 years of experience and knowledge to the facility management field. He discusses the changes and trends he’s seen in the quickly evolving occupation. With technology rapidly influencing the profession, facility managers can expect to see the effect in their everyday jobs and the overall performance of their buildings.

What misconceptions do people have about smart, sustainable buildings?

A common misconception I hear is high-performance buildings or smart buildings must be super expensive and complex. That’s simply not true. Even small buildings that are easier to operate can be smart, high-performance, and sustainable. Most buildings in the United States are smaller, so we can really start making a dent…

What excites you about the future of the facilities business?

The rate at which high-performance building technology is being implemented is really encouraging. The Internet of Things, IoT, is one example. We have adopted IoT technology in our personal lives, and now we’re doing that in our professional lives. People have been using smart phones to remotely control things…

What advice would you give to facility managers just starting out?

One thing to focus on is learning about what’s going to be important in the future. The biggest topic in facility management right now is high-performance buildings and sustainability. Technology is second nature to young professionals just coming in. Understand and learn the technology. Be the “go to” person for your building…

What do people need to know about HPB+W?

This is really the only show of its kind, covering such a wide range of topics. It concentrates on energy and water efficiency, air quality, IoT, technology; all falling under the umbrella of high-performance buildings. This is our third year of the show and we are really hitting our stride…

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How are existing buildings moving toward net zero energy?


The U.S. Department of Energy defines a zero energy building (ZEB) as one that produces enough renewable energy (electricity, fuel combustion) to meet its own annual energy consumption requirements. The building terms “net zero energy” and “zero net energy” are synonymous and are broadly used in the industry.

Energy consumption is averaged over a one-year period. The measurement of energy consumed and energy exported is highly dependent on the site boundary, which could encompass a single building or a cluster of buildings. Not just a building, but a campus, a portfolio, or a community can be zero energy.

Title IV of the Energy Independence and Security Act draws a line in the sand, challenging the building industry — which accounts for 38 percent of total U.S. energy consumption, according to DOE — to build net-zero only buildings after 2025 and retrofit pre-2025 buildings to net-zero by 2050.

California, the world’s environmental leader, has set more aggressive goals, requiring all new residential buildings to be ZNE by 2020, new commercial buildings to be ZNE by 2030, and 50 percent of existing commercial buildings retrofit to ZNE by 2030. Both the federal government and California acknowledge that the zero-net energy goals are ambitious, pointing to the elimination of fossil fuel combustion for generation of heat and hot water as very difficult to implement…

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IV94360: GIS section does not fit to full height on GIS tab of building


The GIS section height could be expanded since there is a lot of white space at the bottom of the screen.

The issue is that about a quarter of an inch of white space was appearing at the bottom of the GIS map. This fix drastically reduces the amount of white space at the bottom of the map. In doing this, this fix also needed to specially handle a scroll bar that was appearing on Firefox due to the reduced white space. A scroll bar is only needed on the map when the Show Options tab or Show Table tab are being shown. We now programmatically set the scroll bar to either “auto” or “hidden” when those tabs are toggled.

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Verdantix: Take note of new efforts to standardise well-being data


On March 7, 2017, the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) launched a programme to develop a set of global standards for sensors and systems that monitor the range of variables which impact worker well-being (e.g. air quality, light levels and humidity). The IWBI, with partners including the Green Building Council of Australia and RESET, aims to improve the quality of data collected on occupant well-being by providing standards for sensor performance, as well as guidance on how firms can analyse this data. This is a potentially interesting development for software vendors across the real estate, energy and facilities information management (REEFIM) market – it has the potential to improve the quality and consistency of well-being data.

Improving occupant well-being continues to be one of the hottest themes across the REEFIM market. Suppliers are positioning existing and new service offerings around occupant well-being, on the promise it can boost productivity and help to reduce absenteeism. For example, Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) vendor Planon collects and analyses data on lighting levels, thermal comfort and air quality, to provide recommendations to customers for improving occupant comfort. Honeywell has developed the Occupant Vector App to allow workers to provide feedback on thermal comfort levels. Mitie is piloting an Intelligent Buildings Solution which looks to boost worker productivity and concentration by optimising internal environments…

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