Serraview: Wayfinding is essential for increasing work productivity


Instead of trying to increase productivity and engagement with supplemental tactics, progressive corporations are introducing wayfinding solutions to alleviate daily headaches for employees. Wayfinding is the leveraging of integrated building technologies to deliver employees real-time visibility into the availability of high demand resources, such as conference rooms, desks, and even colleagues.

According to Steelcase Inc., 40% of employees waste up to 30 minutes a day looking for meeting space. And with most employees attending 62 meetings per month, that’s a lot of valuable time lost! Wayfinding tools show employees what rooms are available now, when the room is booked, and what amenities and technologies are available per room. When employers make it simple for employees to find the type of space they need, it not only improves the employee’s overall experience in the workplace, but allows them to be more productive with their time.

In fact, according to CBRE’s 2017 Americas Occupier Survey, 53% of organizations name “promoting collaboration” as the main driver for their workplace strategy. To collaborate effectively, employees not only need the right resources but also must be able to find their fellow co-workers quickly and easily. Wayfinding tools simplify locating a colleague, and contacting them, by pulling in the employee directory. It’s as simple as searching for the person you need and clicking “call” or “email” to be instantly connected, making each collaborative session more efficient and effective.

To learn more about how wayfinding addresses these issues, watch our video…

[Admin: This post is related to the 04.13.17 post about the impact of IWMS 2.0 on today’s workplace, and the 05.17.16 post about the rising use of meeting rooms (and collaborative overload). To see other related posts, use the Serraview tag.]

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Serraview: Creating an activity-based working (ABW) strategy


Workplace transformation is becoming a primary focus for innovative companies. In fact, according to the CBRE 2017 Americas Occupier Survey Report, 86% of respondents are reinventing or adapting their workplace standards this year. But, where do you start? New and trending strategies seem to appear every week: open office design, hoteling, agile working. How do you know which strategy will work best for your business?

Today, corporations are relying heavily on their real estate teams to revolutionize their workplaces into modern spaces where employees and buildings are both effective and efficient. The multi-generational workforce has higher expectations from their employers and people want more from their office than just a place to sit. To accommodate these diverse needs and demands, leading enterprises are seeing the most success with activity-based working environments.

Leesman describes activity-based working (ABW) as a transformational business strategy that provides people with a choice of setting, rather than forcing individuals to work at a singular desk location. Companies who have adopted ABW in their workplace strategy are finding it to be a long-term solution that addresses the modern workforce needs as well as aligning with business goals.

To learn how progressive enterprises are developing successful ABW strategies, read our new step-by-step guide: “Creating an Activity Based Working Strategy”.

[Admin: To see other related posts, use the Serraview tag or CBRE tag.]

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Finding the gap between large and small building sustainability


There’s a significant gap between large and small office buildings in achieving sustainability certification, according to a new study by CBRE Group, Inc. and Maastricht University.

The 2015 Green Building Adoption Index, a joint project of CBRE and Maastricht, found that 62.1% of office buildings in the U.S. greater than 500,000 square feet are considered “green” (holding either an EPA ENERGY STAR label, U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) full-building LEED certification, or both). In contrast, only 4.5% of all U.S. office buildings less than 100,000 square feet qualified as green.

“Our 2015 study confirmed that green building adoption has been primarily a big building, first-tier city phenomenon,” said David Pogue, CBRE’s global director of corporate responsibility. “It would appear that many smaller buildings in the majority of large markets still have an opportunity to be ‘best in class’ among their peer set by achieving these certifications.”

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