Serraview: 8 Workplace statistics make you rethink space planning


What we think of as the “traditional office” (clusters of cubicles in the center of a space, surrounded by private offices around the perimeter) is going away — about 70% of US offices have some type of “open office” design.

Companies are starting to go beyond just workplace space planning by investing in healthy building features and looking for ways to provide more choice and autonomy to their employees, but why? Are these strategies actually working, or are they just following trends? Is it worth it to redesign your office layout and make dramatic changes to how your employees work?

Let’s dig into some statistics that shed some light on how the workspace impacts the employee experience and what that might mean for your company:

  • Innovative companies are 5 times more likely to have workplaces that prioritize individual and group workspace…
  • 69% of businesses that implemented healthy building features reported improvements in employee satisfaction and engagement…
  • People are 12% more likely to report being happy with their job when they have freedom and autonomy in their work environment…
  • 37% of job candidates will accept a job with a lower salary if the company offers appealing culture, workplace facilities and technology…
  • 42.5% of the global workforce will be mobile employees by 2022…
  • 85% of respondents in a CBRE survey expect to see increase in mobility in the workplace through activity-based workplaces…
  • 70% of employees age 16-44 say they want to be more mobile at work…
  • 30% of energy used in a commercial building is wasted

[Admin: This post is related to the 05.17.16 post about the use of meeting rooms (and collaborative overload), the 11.01.17 post by FacilitiesNet about the inefficient use of office space, and the 06.01.18 post by FM:Systems about the employee-centric workplace. To see other related posts, use the Workplace tag.]

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Serraview: Workplace strategies are revolutionizing office space


The modern workplace is transforming the way people think about their office space. Leading enterprises are leveraging their workplace to benefit their business and their people. We recently hosted a webinar to address the best practices for the modern workplace…

How to Take a Workplace from Lifeless to Lively

When beginning a workplace transformation, you must gather data to understand how your company and how employees work. There are many ways to collect data, but Jill Zunshine presents 3 steps that cannot be forgotten.

  • Business Strategies: Understand each business line and function areas of your business…
  • Employee Feedback: Gather and analyze engagement scores and satisfaction surveys…
  • Utilization Percentages: Collect how space is being used and what spaces are being used for what type of activity…

Technology in the Modern Workplace

From experience, Tom Zampini sees three problems that have arisen regarding the modern workplace:

  • Over Spending: Large and inflexible portfolios are heavily underused.
  • Failure to Embrace Digital: There’s a failure to embrace digital, and thinking that mobility undermines productivity.
  • Working Environment: Companies are either working in new ways in old spaces, or working in new spaces that impede real work…

Industry Trends & Consulting Experiences

Once you have an activity-based work (ABW) environment, how do you support the employee’s productivity and innovation? Luc Kamperman follows 3 factors to lead to better performance and personal satisfaction.

  • Autonomy: People want to explore, learn, and foster their inner drive. This can be supported by giving people control in their environment.
  • Mastery: Employees should strive to get better at doing things, and encourage improvements and growth.
  • Purpose: What is connecting them to their work and workplace?

[Admin: This post is related to the 04.20.17 post about taking a workplace from lifeless to lively. To see other related posts, use the Serraview tag.]

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FM trends in workplace design focus on occupant satisfaction


Several factors are inspiring designers to “up the ante” in the creation of office designs today. One factor is that CEOs and upper management are electing to sit and work among their employees, in order to eliminate hierarchies and spur more democratic collaborations among departments and between individuals.

Another factor is the need to provide flexible work environments for individual and shared work, while ensuring the technology required at these workstations is mobile, invisible, and where possible, wireless. Finally, in order to attract and retain new generations of employees, and keep them healthy, productive, and happy, facility managers are seeking out new inspired and imaginative approaches to workplace design. Here are two strategies that address all of those factors.

Redistribution of space

The days of the large conference room are gone (along with their large conference tables). They’re simply underutilized in an era of more mobile and smaller, shared workspaces. There’s a widespread realization that open office plans, with low panels between workstations, generate more distractions than productivity…

Multipurpose circulation space

For decades, companies have viewed circulation as a necessary evil, as space required to get employees from one area to another. As a result, designers would program in a 35 to 40 percent circulation factor. Today, designs are increasing that to upwards of 50 percent, driven by the evolution of circulation into multipurpose experiential spaces essential to creativity and collaboration…

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Making the business case for smart buildings


From: Making The Business Case For Smart Buildings, FacilitiesNet

In the past decade, facility managers have witnessed dramatic development and maturation in building systems, smart technologies, and the ability to collect, analyze, and share data across the building infrastructure. The building automation system (BAS) has long been the center point of logic and control in building operations, and can be very effective in optimizing HVAC, lighting, and other energy-consuming systems. But the facility world is changing, and to capture the true opportunities of building intelligence, it is necessary for facility managers to think beyond the BAS as the future engine of intelligence and optimization…

Here’s a modern definition of an intelligent building: A truly intelligent building is informative, predictive, responsive, adaptive, diagnostic, corrective, and self-healing. It will understand and respond to occupancy and activities and provide information and personal awareness that will drive and change behavioral responses. In doing so, it will create asset value and competitive advantage through continuous improvement and enhanced experiential satisfaction…

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Building occupant satisfaction, sustainability link revealed


DTZ, a commercial real estate services provider, has completed research revealing a link between building occupant satisfaction and sustainability efforts in buildings.

DTZ Vice President, Sustainability Services Allison Porter and DTZ Economist Rebecca Rockey evaluated responses to Kingsley Associates’ surveys relative to common sustainability certifications. The study examined three building-specific certifications: the U.S. Green Building Council‘s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance (LEED EB), EPA‘s ENERGY STAR, and the Office of Management and Budget‘s (OMB) Sustainability and Energy Scorecard, a sustainability evaluation standard for federal government-occupied buildings. Porter and Rockey analyzed 61 office buildings in the Washington, DC, region.

“This research confirms what we’ve long assumed—that sustainability impacts how tenants perceive their workplace,” said Marla Maloney, President, Asset Services, Americas at DTZ. “It also bolsters previous research linking sustainability to improved property values and returns. Sustainability is not only a measure to improve our built and natural environment, it’s also a sound, forward-thinking business practice with a proven, positive business impact, from lowering costs to improving client services and satisfaction.”

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